As the cooler weather marches on, some motorcyclists are going to put away their motorcycles for the season. Others will decide to continue riding for as long as the roads are safe. Because not everyone stops riding at the same time, it’s imperative that all drivers on the roads pay close attention to what’s going on around them. This includes looking for motorcycles.

While it’s up to other drivers to ensure that they’re driving safely, there are also some important things that motorcyclists need to do to boost their safety.

Watch for deer and other wildlife

Deer and other wildlife are more likely to come out near roadways from dusk to dawn. They are out searching for food and won’t know to avoid vehicles. Try to watch on the side of the road so you can have a warning if they’re heading toward where cars are streaking by. You may see the reflective properties of the animal’s eyes, which should signal you to prepare for the animal to dart into the road.

Avoid leaves on the roadway

The vibrant colors of the leaves as they change before falling off the trees are beautiful, but they pose a hazard to motorcyclists once they fall. These leaves can be as slick as ice when they’re damp, which makes them especially hazardous early in the mornings when the dew hasn’t had a chance to dry yet.

Look for ice and frost on the road

Ice and frost on the roadways, which are common in Indiana during the colder months of the year, can cause your motorcycle’s tires to slide, which may result in your losing control of the motorcycle. It isn’t always easy to see this, and black ice can quickly turn a motorcycle ride into a fight for your life. When you’re out riding, be sure that you leave yourself an “out” so you can avoid the ice or frost without having to worry about darting in front of another driver.

Despite your best efforts, there’s a chance that you might be struck by a motorist. Seeking medical care and pursuing a claim for compensation may be beneficial if you’re in this position. Be sure to do these quickly since conditions can worsen without medical care and time limits apply to seeking compensation.